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Todaro ALA Initiative SCHOOL LIBRARIES WORKSPACE "Libraries Transform: The Expert in the Library": School Librarian-PSEL Competencies: Building our Expertise

Instructions

These personal professional growth competencies were developed by 2016-2017 ALA President Julie Todaro’s presidential initiative task force. These can be used to help any school librarian in transitioning to the AASL National School Library Standards that will be released in November 2017 at AASL’s National Conference in Phoenix, AZ.

Personal Professional Growth Tool
Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competencies 1-11

  • Choose the competency 1-11 that you want to work on.
  • Identify in the rubric your level of Expertise.
  • Move to the resources to read those recommended to support your growth to a higher level, as well as the AASL resources for all levels

School Librarian Competencies based on the PSELs April, 2017

 

1. Mission, Vision and Core Values - Effective School Library leaders develop, advocate, and enact a shared mission, vision, and core values of high-quality education and academic and/or professional success and well-being of each learner.

2. Ethical Principles and Professional Norms – Effective School Library leaders act ethically and according to professional norms to promote each learner’s academic success and well-being and/or practitioners’ professional success.

3. Equity and Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness - Effective School Library leaders strive for equity and inclusivity of educational opportunity, and culturally and linguistically responsive practices to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.

4. Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment - Effective School Library leaders design, deliver and support intellectually rigorous and coherent systems of curriculum, instruction and assessment to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.

5. Community of Care and Support for Students - Effective School Library Leaders cultivate an inclusive caring and supportive school community that promotes each learner’s academic and/or professional success, personal interests and well-being.

6. Professional Capacity of School Personnel - Effective School Library leaders develop their personal professional capacity and practice to best support other school personnel in order to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.

7. Professional Community for Teachers and Staff - Effective School Library leaders foster development of a professional community of teachers and other professional staff to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.

8. Meaningful Engagement of Families and Community - Effective School Library leaders engage families and the community in meaningful, reciprocal, and mutually beneficial ways to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.

9. Operations and Management - Effective School Library leaders manage resources and operations to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by creating an inviting environment, providing a flexible program, developing the collection, curating and organizing the resources, integrating digital and technology access, managing appropriate funding and encouraging critical thinking to create a community of lifelong learners.

10. School Improvement - Effective School Library leaders act as agents of continuous improvement to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.

11. Literacy and Reading – Effective School Library leaders promote reading for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment (and) are aware of major trends in children's and young adult literature. They select reading materials in multiple formats to support reading for information, pleasure, and lifelong learning. They use a variety of strategies to reinforce classroom reading instruction to address the diverse needs and interests of all readers. Literacy takes many forms (EX: digital, information, cultural, etc.) that all rely on the foundational literacy of reading.

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PSEL attribution: National Policy Board for Educational Administration (2015). Professional Standards for Educational Leaders, 2015. Reston, VA: Author. CC BY-NC-ND.

 

Links to RUBRICS for Competency  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11

Links to RESOURCES for Competency  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11

Repeat the process as many times as you want for as many competencies as you want.

This is your opportunity to become a stronger school librarian.

School Librarian-PSEL - What and Why

School Librarian Competencies based on the PSELs with Rubric: An Introduction

What does PSEL stand for? Professional Standards for Educational Leaders.
The PSELs were written by the National Policy Board for Educational Administrators and are being embraced by them.

[National Policy Board for Educational Administration (2015). Professional Standards for Educational Leaders 2015. Reston, VA: Author. CC BY-NC-ND.]

What is this School Librarian-PSEL Rubric?
In her capacity as  Program Director for the MS in School Leadership with School Librarian Certification at Granite State College, Susan Ballard (also a Todaro co-chair) adapted the ten competencies included in the PSELs for school librarians - and she added one, Literacy, an essential for librarians! School librarians work every day with their school communities and need to use the language of administrators when working with them and developing their own leadership. Todaro School co-chairs Susan, Sara Kelly Johns and Dorcas Hand, with a committee of other school library leaders, used Susan’s work to develop the following Competency continuum to encourage professional growth across the broad community of school librarians.

This Todaro ALA Presidential  Initiative, The Expert in the Library, has worked to offer practitioners tools to improve our work product in practical, philosophical and pedagogical ways. School Librarians need to be strong Educational Leaders every day to affect student achievement in the most useful ways. The following rubric offers the 11 competencies derived from the PSELs, and demonstrates how a range of implementation might look to a practitioner. 

All readers of this work can discover how accomplished you think you are in any one or all 11 competencies and then find resources to challenge yourself to a stronger understanding and practice. There is no scoring system or survey; just read the rubric and decide what works best for you. What do you want to work on today? Resources are included to advance personal learning along the continuum from Ineffective to Highly Effective. You may learn you are only Emerging for some skills but Highly Effective in others - that is really the point. We all have room to grow, and great practitioners are lifelong learners who are always striving to get better at how you support student achievement in their school Library practice. 

Todaro School Library Committee:
Dorcas Hand, Co-Chair; Sara Kelly Johns, Co-Chair; Susan Ballard, Co-Chair; Angela Hall; Debra Kachel; Jennifer Jamison; Joyce Valenza; Kathy Hicks Brooks; Kathy Burnette; Kay Wejrowski; Ric Hasenyager

Todaro School Library Expert Panel members, assigned to review the work of the School Library Group: Debbie Abilock and Blanche Woolls

School Librarian Competencies based on the PSEL's

Thank you to Susan Ballard for these adaptations that use the vocabulary of school administrators to describe the work of school librarians.

Original PSELs: National Policy Board for Educational Administration (2015). Professional Standards for Educational Leaders 2015. Reston, VA: Author. CC BY-NC-ND.

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #1

  1. RUBRIC FOR Mission, Vision and Core Values - Effective School Library leaders develop, advocate, and enact a shared mission, vision, and core values of high-quality education and academic and/or professional success and well-being of each learner.   COMPETENCY 1 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders share a written school library mission and vision statement aligning library resources, services, and standards with the school’s mission, vision, values and implementation program and enumerating elements of implementation of this plan in a stated timeframe for completion; further, these leaders continue to re-assess the plan for ongoing update and growth.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders develop, advocate, and enact a shared school library mission, vision, and core values of high-quality education and academic and/or professional success and well-being of each learner that aligns library resources, services, and standards with the school’s mission, vision, values and implementation program.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders begin to develop, advocate and enact a shared school library mission, vision, and core values aligned with high-quality education and academic and/or professional success and well-being of each learner that aligns library resources, services, and standards with the school’s mission, vision, values and implementation program.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE: Ineffective School Library Leaders have no complete statement of school library mission, vision, values or implementation program, whether aligning library resources, services, and standards with the school’s mission, vision, values and implementation program or not. RESOURCES

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #2

2.  RUBRIC for Ethical Principles and Professional Norms – Effective School Library leaders act ethically and according to professional norms to promote each learner’s academic success and well-being and/or practitioners’ professional success.  COMPETENCY 2 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library Leaders act ethically and according to professional norms to promote each learner’s academic success and well-being and/or practitioner’s professional success. These leaders uphold and teach tenets of intellectual freedom, student privacy, respect for all among other core ethical standards.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders act ethically and according to professional norms to promote each learner’s academic success and well being and/or practitioner’s professional success. School library ethics address intellectual freedom, student privacy, respect for all among other core tenets.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders learn to act ethically and according to professional norms to promote each learner’s academic success and well-being and/or practitioner professional success. They begin to address intellectual freedom, student privacy, respect for all among other core tenets.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders do not consult professional ethical standards/norms, which can result in learner and/or practitioner professional underachievement.  RESOURCES

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #3

3. RUBRIC for Equity and Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness - Effective School Library leaders strive for equity and inclusivity of educational opportunity, and culturally and linguistically responsive practices to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  COMPETENCY 3 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders advocate for and implement equity of educational opportunity by

  • Providing plentiful  broad resources to counteract limited vocabulary development and access to books and digital tools/resources;
  • Implementing and embedding culturally and linguistically responsive practices planned in collaboration with teachers and by interaction with students to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being;
  • Developing policy that supports provision of and access to plentiful resources that recognize, respect, and celebrate diversity as assets in teaching and learning; to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders strive for equity and inclusivity of educational opportunity

  • By counteracting limited vocabulary development and access to books and digital tools/resources;
  • Implementing culturally and linguistically  responsive practices supported by interactions with students and staff;
  • Developing policy that supports provision of and access to resources that recognize and respect diversity as assets in teaching and learning;

to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders begin to understand equity of educational opportunity

  • By offering print and digital tools/resources for readers with limited vocabulary;
  • Discovering culturally and linguistically responsive practices and staff/student interactions that may promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being ;
  • Beginning to understand a need to respect the diversity of the school’s students and staff;
  • By starting to develop fair and equitable access policies towards  a representational collection of resources that respect diversity and culture in teaching and learning; to promote academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders lack understanding of equity of educational opportunity. They offer

  • Few resources to offset limited vocabulary
  • Limited understanding of the diversity, cultures, and needs represented among the students and staff,
  • Outdated policies that do not promote equity of access for all students, or practice resource/collection strategies or reflect the diversity of the school’s students and staff to promote academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

 

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #4

4.  RUBRIC for Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment - Effective School Library leaders design, deliver and support intellectually rigorous and coherent systems of curriculum, instruction and assessment to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  COMPETENCY 4 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders design, deliver and support intellectually rigorous and coherent systems of curriculum, instruction and assessment in collaboration with classroom teachers and administration to assure each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders design, deliver and support intellectually rigorous and coherent systems of curriculum, instruction and assessment in coordination with classroom teachers to enhance each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders begin to design, deliver and support coherent systems of curriculum, instruction and assessment to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders do not design, deliver and support coherent systems of curriculum, instruction and assessment or have an awareness of the range of learner’s academic and/or professional needs.  RESOURCES

 

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #5

5. RUBRIC for Community of Care and Support for Students - Effective School Library Leaders cultivate an inclusive caring and supportive school community that promotes each learner’s academic and/or professional success, personal interests and well-being.  COMPETENCY 5 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders cultivate an inclusive caring and supportive school community that promotes each learner’s academic and/or professional success, personal interests and well-being that

  • Always welcomes every learner into a caring, collaborative and inclusive environment;
  • Works consistently to empower every struggling student to be more successful;
  • Provides a constantly safe haven to all, especially those marginalized in any way.

They develop the strong professional connections essential to building a strong, inclusive community that persistently incorporates virtual, face to face and digital opportunities to expand the caring and support of stakeholders as part of an effective school library program.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders cultivate an inclusive caring and supportive school community that promotes each learner’s academic and/or professional success, personal interests and well-being that

  • Welcomes every learner and develops a caring, collaborative and inclusive environment;
  • Works to empower struggling students to be more successful;
  • Offers a safe haven to all, especially those marginalized in any way.

They develop professional connections essential to building a strong, inclusive community and incorporate virtual, face to face and digital opportunities to expand the caring and support of stakeholders as part of an effective school library program.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders begin to understand the need for a caring and supportive school community that promotes each learner’s academic and/or professional success, personal interests and well-being that

  • Welcomes learners to an environment aiming to be inclusive, caring and collaborative environment;
  • Seeks to empower struggling students to be more successful;
  • Begins to develop a safe haven for all.

They start to build professional connections in support of a strong, inclusive community  as they consider virtual, face to face and digital opportunities to expand the caring and support of stakeholders as part of their school library program.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders have limited understanding of how to cultivate a supportive school community offering

  • A minimally inclusive, caring and collaborative environment
  • Little support to struggling students
  • Atmosphere is not that of a safe haven.

They choose not to embrace professional connections or virtual, digital, and face to face opportunities that promote academic and professional success for the school library leader and school community.  RESOURCES

 

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #6

6.  RUBRIC for Professional Capacity of School Personnel - Effective School Library leaders develop their personal professional capacity and practice to best support other school personnel in order to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  COMPETENCY 6 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders leaders consistently develop their own professional capacity and practice to best support other school personnel to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Leading, both in their buildings and in the larger profession, as they assess professional learning needs across grade levels and disciplines;
  • Monitoring networked online communities of practice, professional literature; national and state organizations and their standards, and recognized, evidence-based effective practice to develop meaningful, forward-thinking, curated and sustained learning opportunities and engage in research to ensure whole-school and personalized faculty current awareness, innovative practice and growth.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders leaders develop personal professional capacity and practice to best support other school personnel in order to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being  by

  • Regularly assessing professional learning needs across grade levels and disciplines;
  • Keeping up to date with networked online communities of practice, professional literature; national and state organizations and their standards, and recognized, evidence-based effective practice to develop meaningful, forward-thinking, curated and sustained learning opportunities and engage in research to ensure whole-school and personalized faculty current awareness, innovative practice and growth.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders leaders begin to develop their own professional capacity and practice to support other school personnel in order to promote learners’ academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Starting to assess professional learning needs across grade levels and disciplines;
  • Are beginning to monitor networked online communities of practice, professional literature; national and state organizations and their standards, and recognized, evidence-based effective practice to develop meaningful, forward-thinking, curated and sustained learning opportunities and engage in research to ensure whole-school and personalized faculty current awareness, innovative practice and growth.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders  are not developing their own professional capacity or practice to support other  school personnel in order to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.

  • They have no strategies to regularly assess professional learning needs across grade levels and disciplines;
  • They have no idea how or why to monitor networked online communities of practice, professional literature; national and state organizations and their standards, and recognized, evidence-based effective practice to develop meaningful, forward-thinking, curated and sustained learning opportunities and engage in research to ensure whole-school and personalized faculty current awareness, innovative practice and growth.  RESOURCES

 

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #7

7. RUBRIC for Professional Community for Teachers and Staff - Effective School Library leaders foster development of a professional community of teachers and other professional staff to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  COMPETENCY 7 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders foster the development of a vibrant professional community of teachers and/or other professional staff to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Providing frequent and planned opportunities for collaborative examination of practice, collegial feedback and collective learning;
  • Consistently modeling, sharing, and promoting principles of teaching and learning as collaborative partners with other educators;
  • Regularly designing and implementing job- embedded and other opportunities for professional collaboration with faculty and staff.

They also participate and collaborate regularly as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders develop a professional community of teachers and other professional staff to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Providing opportunities for collaborative examination of practice, collegial feedback and collective learning as well as regular library duties.
  • Modeling, sharing and promoting principles of teaching and learning as collaborative partners with other educators
  • Designing and implementing job- embedded and other opportunities for professionally collaboratively with faculty and staff.

They do not yet participate and collaborate often as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders begin to develop a professional community of teachers and or other professional staff to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Providing occasional opportunities for collaborative examination of practice, collegial feedback and collective learning as well as regular library duties.
  • Seeing the need to model share or promote principles of teaching and learning as collaborative partners with other educators
  • Designing and implementing occasional job- embedded opportunities for professionally collaboratively with faculty and staff.

They do not yet understand the need to participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library Leaders do not foster development of a professional community of teachers and or other professional staff to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Providing any opportunities for collaborative examination of practice, collegial feedback and collective learning.
  • Modeling, sharing or promoting any principles of teaching and learning as collaborative partners with other educators
  • Designing or implementing job-embedded and other opportunities for professionally collaboratively with faculty and staff.

Ineffective SL Leaders also do not see a need to participate or collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners.  RESOURCES

 

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #8

8.  RUBRIC for Meaningful Engagement of Families and Community - Effective School Library leaders engage families and the community in meaningful, reciprocal, and mutually beneficial ways to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  COMPETENCY 8 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library  Leaders frequently and creatively engage the community in meaningful, reciprocal and mutually beneficial ways to promote each learner's academic and/or professional success and well-being. RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders engage families and the community in meaningful, reciprocal, and mutually beneficial ways to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders try to engage families and the community in meaningful and beneficial ways to promote learning, academic progress and professional growth.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library Leaders do not even try to engage families or the community in any meaningful, reciprocal or beneficial ways to promote academic or professional success.  RESOURCES

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #9

9.  RUBRIC for Operations and Management - Effective School Library leaders manage resources and operations to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by creating an inviting environment, providing a flexible program, developing the collection, curating and organizing the resources, integrating digital and technology access, managing appropriate funding and encouraging critical thinking to create a community of lifelong learners.  COMPETENCY 9 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders manage resources and operations to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Creating an inviting environment that welcomes all students and staff to use (and request additional) resources to build understanding to improve their world;
  • Providing a flexible program conducive to learning reflective of diverse academic needs, learning styles and wide ranging personal interests;
  • Developing the collection to reflect academic, cultural and other diversities while  
  • meeting and anticipates ever changing student and staff learning needs;
  • Curating and organizing the resources for easiest student location, access, use and enthusiastic curiosity;
  • Integrating current technology devices and resources into the teaching and learning environment;
  • Request, manage and build appropriate sustained funding to support changing  student needs and achieve school goals and objectives
  • Encouraging every learner to think critically, evaluate information, draw conclusions and create and share new knowledge.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders manage resources and operations to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Creating an environment that is inviting to all students and staff as they use resources and participate in programming;
  • Providing a flexible program conducive to learning;
  • Developing a collection that meets student and staff learning needs;
  • Curating and organizing the resources for easiest student location, access and use;
  • Integrating technology devices and resources
  • into the teaching and learning environment;
  • Managing sustained funding to support student needs and achieve school goals and objectives;
  • Encouraging learners to think critically, evaluate information, draw conclusions and create and share new knowledge to create a community of lifelong learners.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders begin to manage resources and operations to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being by

  • Beginning to envision an environment that is inviting to all students and staff;
  • Providing as best as possible a flexible program conducive to learning;
  • Working to develop a collection that meets student and staff learning needs;
  • Learning to curate and organize the resources for easiest student location, access and use;
  • Providing technology devices and resources for the teaching and learning environment; Managing provided funding to support student needs and achieve school goals and objectives;
  • Work to encourage learners to think critically, evaluate information, draw conclusions and create and share new knowledge to create a community of lifelong learners.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders do not manage resources and operations to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being. They lack understanding of skills needed to

  • Create an environment that is inviting to any students and staff;
  • Provide a flexible program;
  • Develop a collection to meet student and staff learning needs;
  • Curate or organize the resources for student location, access and use;
  • Provide technology devices and resources for the teaching and learning environment;
  • Manage funding to support student needs
  • and achieve school goals and objectives;
  • Encourage learners to think critically, evaluate information, draw conclusions or create and share new knowledge in any community.  RESOURCES

 

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #10

10.  Rubric for School Improvement - Effective School Library leaders act as agents of continuous improvement to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being.  COMPETENCY 10 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders create data such as action research to act as agents of continuous improvement to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being through an inquiry-based approach, utilizing a variety of instructional strategies to meet a diverse learning population, while collaborating with other all stakeholders to meet the mission core values and curricula of the school community.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders use data to act as agents of continuous improvement to promote each learner’s academic and/or professional success and well-being through an inquiry-based approach, utilizing a variety of instructional strategies to meet a diverse learning population, while collaborating with other teachers to meet the mission core values and curricula of the school community.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders act as agents of improvement to promote some of the learners’ academic and/or professional success and well-being through an inquiry-based approach, utilizing a variety of instructional strategies to meet a diverse learning population; however,  in isolation from most other teachers.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders do not promote academic and/or professional success and well-being because their program is devoid of any inquiry-based approach and in isolation from other teachers and curricula.  RESOURCES

 

Self-Assessment Using School Librarian-PSEL Competency #11

11. RUBRIC for Literacy and Reading – Effective School Library leaders promote reading for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment (and) are aware of major trends in children's and young adult literature. They select reading materials in multiple formats to support reading for information, pleasure, and lifelong learning. They use a variety of strategies to reinforce classroom reading instruction to address the diverse needs and interests of all readers. Literacy takes many forms (EX: digital, information, cultural, etc.) that all rely on the foundational literacy of reading.  COMPETENCY 11 RESOURCES

HIGHLY EFFECTIVE School Library leaders promote reading and appreciation in many formats for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment. They

  • Use the major trends in children’s and young adult literature to develop a responsive collection.
  • Select reading material in multiple formats and languages that reflect many different cultural perspectives and worldviews to support reading for information, pleasure, and to promote lifelong learning.
  • Continuously address differentiation with classroom teachers by using established instructional
  • strategies to support learner comprehension of a wide variety of sources, reflecting the diverse needs and interests of all readers.
  • Promote resources and library programming, incorporating  literacy’s many forms (EX: digital, information, cultural, etc.)  that are all reliant on the foundational literacy of reading.  RESOURCES

EFFECTIVE School Library leaders promote reading for learning, personal growth, and enjoyment. They

  • Are aware of major trends in children's and young adult literature.
  • Select reading materials in multiple formats reflecting different worldviews to support reading for information, pleasure, and lifelong learning.
  • Address differentiation with classroom teachers by using established instructional strategies to support learner comprehension of a variety of sources, reflecting the diverse needs and interests of all readers. Use a variety of strategies to reinforce classroom reading instruction to address
  • the diverse needs and interests of all readers.
  • Know that literacy takes many forms (EX: digital, information, cultural, etc.) that should all be reflected in library programs that rely on the foundational literacy of reading.  RESOURCES

EMERGING School Library leaders promote reading for learning and enjoyment. They

  • Select reading material to support reading for information and pleasure.
  • Select reading materials in various formats to  support reading for information, pleasure, and to promote lifelong learning.
  • Begin to address differentiation with classroom teachers by using established instructional strategies to support learner comprehension of some sources, reflecting the diverse needs and interests of all readers.
  • Know that literacy has different aspects (EX: digital, information, etc.) that should be reflected
  • in library programs that rely on the foundational literacy of reading.  RESOURCES

INEFFECTIVE School Library leaders don’t know how to promote reading for enjoyment. They do not

  • Know how to select reading material to support reading for pleasure.
  • Purchase resources in multiple formats that support  reading for information, pleasure, and/or to promote lifelong learning.
  • Understand reading strategies used in the classroom.
  • Recognize any other aspects of literacy (EX: digital, information, etc.) that could be reflected in library programs.  RESOURCES

 

Link Notes

NOTE:

  • Any article content not live linked below is searchable in the standard databases unless otherwise noted. Books will be available in libraries or for purchase.
  • KQ content opens without password after 2 years. Links provided, but you may need a password.
  • SLC (School Library Connection) is a Libraries Unlimited publication only available by subscription password. Some articles have been opened specially for this Expert in the Library project.

Resources for Competency #1 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #1: Mission, Vision, Core Values
                 COMPETENCY 1 RUBRIC

Koren, Johan. "Vision Mission Goals and Objectives for the School Library Media Center." 2008. SlideShare. Lecture. Even though this is 2008, it covers the overview beautifully.
 

Matthews, Steve. "Five Answers to Successful Strategic Planning." 21st Century Library Blog, 13 Jan. 2014. Includes great chart illustrating the process.

"Strategic Planning for Libraries: School Libraries." Massachusetts Library System, 26 Oct. 2016. Includes a template/worksheet.

Koren, Johan. "Vision Mission Goals and Objectives for the School Library Media Center.” 2008. SlideShare. Lecture. Even though this is 2008, it covers the overview beautifully.
 

Matthews, Steven. "Five Answers to Successful Strategic Planning." 21st Century Library Blog, 13 Jan. 2014. Includes great chart illustrating the process.
 

"Sample IPEGS [Instructional Performance Evaluation and Growth System] Goal Statements (DRAFT)." Library Media Services, Jefferson County (KY) Public Schools, Sept. 2011.

 

"Strategic Planning for Libraries: School Libraries." Massachusetts Library System, 26 Oct. 2016, http://guides.masslibsystem.org/strategicplanning/schoolplanning. Includes a template/worksheet.

Burns, Elizabeth. "Take Action! Advocacy = Building Stakeholder Relationships." School Library Connection October 2015.
 

Foote, Carolyn. "School Libraries: Leading the Way into the Future." School Library Connection October 2015.


Dickinson, Gail K. "The Next Generation of Us." School Library Connection December 2016.

 

GENERAL

Matthews, Stephen A., and Kimberly D. Matthews. Crash Course in Strategic Planning. Santa Barbara, CA, ABC-CLIO, 2013.

Crowley, John D. Developing a Vision: Strategic Planning for the School Librarian in the 21st Century. 2nd ed., Santa Barbara, Libraries Unlimited, 2011.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Papers, Policies and Toolkits, etc.

AASL. Definition for an Effective School Library Program. 2016.

AASL. Instructional Role for the School Librarian. 2016.

AASL. Role of the School Library Program. 2016.

AASL. Confidentiality of Library Records. 2012.

Complete list of AASL position statements

Hopkins, Dianne McAfee. School Library Media Centers and Intellectual Freedom. 2001.

Access to Resources and Services in the School Library Media Program, An Interpretation of the LIBRARY BILL OF RIGHTS. 2014.

Schement, Jorge Reina. Imagining Fairness: Equality and Equity of Access in Search of Democracy. An article from the forum, "The Information Commons, New Technology, and the Future of Libraries." Published June 2002 at info-commons.org, Copyright © Jorge Reina Schement

 

KQ

Adams, Helen, Editor. "Intellectual Freedom." Knowledge Quest vol. 44, no. 1, Sept/Oct. 2015. Full issue.

Adams, Helen. "Intellectual Freedom." Knowledge Quest vol. 36, no. 2, Nov/Dec 2007. pp.12-15.

Books

Intellectual Freedom Manual, Overview to 7th edition with updates

 

Magi, Trina, and Martin Garnar, editors. Intellectual Freedom Manual. 9th ed., ALA, 2015. 

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #2 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #2: Ethical Principles and Professional Norms

             COMPETENCY 2 RUBRIC

Baxter, Veanna. "Ethics And The Library Media Specialist." School Library Media Activities Monthly, vol. 25, no. 2, 2008, pp. 27-29. ERIC, Web. Accessed 12 November 2016.

 

Be sure to read and apply the ALA/AASL ethics links listed here:

ALA Library Bill of Rights and AASL Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
Access to Resources and Services in the School Library Media Program
other interpretations related to minors’ access to library resources.

Adams, Helen R. "Internet Filtering: Are We Making Any Progress?" School Library Connection April 2016.

 

Levitov, Deborah. "Educating School Administrators." School Library Monthly, vol. 26, no. 6, 2010, pp. 45-47. ERIC, Web. Accessed  20 October 2016.
 

Cramb, Peter. "Library Ethics: Eight Cylinder Engine Or Rear Windscreen Wipers?." Aplis, vol. 7, no. 4, 1994, p. 226. Professional Development Collection, Web. Accessed 18 October 2016.

Haycock, Ken. "Leadership Is About You. (Cover Story)." School Library Monthly, vol. 26, no. 6, 2010, pp. 42-44. Academic Search Complete. Web. Accessed 20 October 2016.


Martin, Ann M. "Achieving That Elusive Leadership Zone." Knowledge Quest, vol. 45, no. 1, 2016, pp. 54-60. Academic Search Complete. Web. Accessed 20 October 2016.

"International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)."International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA). IFLA, June 2015. Web. Accessed 30 October 2016.

GENERAL

Adams, Helen. “Protecting Intellectual Freedom and Privacy in Your School Library.” Libraries Unlimited, 2013.

 

Hoffman, Kathy. "Professional Ethics And Librarianship." Texas Library Journal, vol. 81, no. 3, 2005, p. 96. Accessed 12 November 2016.

 

Schement, Jorge Reina. Imagining Fairness: Equality and Equity of Access in Search of Democracy. An article from the forum, "The Information Commons, New Technology, and the Future of Libraries." Published June 2002 at info-commons.org

 

Simpson, Carol. "School Library Ethics--A Battle Of Hats." Library Media Monthly, vol. 22, no. 4, 2004, pp. 22-23. ERIC. Web. Accessed 12 November 2016.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc.

Code of Ethics of the American Library Association.” Advocacy, Legislation &Amp; Issues, 4 Jan. 2017, .

Declaration of the Right to School Libraries. 2014.

Library Bill of Rights.” AAUP Bulletin, vol. 43, no. 2, 1 June 1957, pp. 288–288.

Access to Resources and Services in the School Library Media Program.” Advocacy, Legislation &Amp; Issues, American Library Association, 4 Oct. 2016.

Other interpretations related to minors’ access to library resources. Various dates.

 

Hopkins, Diane McAfee. “School Library Media Centers and Intellectual Freedom.” Advocacy, Legislation & Issues, American Library Association, 10 January 2012.

 

KQ

Adams, Helen, Editor. "Intellectual Freedom." Knowledge Quest vol. 44, no. 1, Sept/Oct. 2015. Full issue.

 

Adams, Helen. "Intellectual Freedom." Knowledge Quest vol. 36, no. 2, Nov/Dec 2007. pp.12-15.

Books

New Intellectual Freedom Handbook, 8th edition. 2010.

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #3 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #3: Equity and Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness

       COMPETENCY 3 RUBRIC

2016 ALA Emerging Leaders-Team A. “Resource Guide for Underserved Populations.” ALA, 2016.

 

Farmer, L. S. J. (2016). Thinking globally locally." CSLA Journal, 39(2), 18-19.  “importance for school library staff to become globally literate in order to meet the needs of multicultural student population in California.”

 

Howard, T. C. (2010). Why race and culture matter in schools: Closing the achievement gap in America’s classrooms. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

 

Neuman, Eric. "Disconnected in the Connected World." School Library Connection December 2015.

 

Wong, Tracey. "eTools and Ideas for English Language Learners." School Library Connection September 2015.

Hunsinger, Valarie. School librarians as equity warriors. Knowledge Quest, 44(1). 2015.

 

Kimmel, Sue C. Developing collections to empower learners. Chicago, IL: AASL, 2014.

 

Paradis, Judi. "Exploring Your School Continent by Continent: An Approach to Multicultural Sharing." School Library Connection January 2016.

 

Patton, J. A.  (2008). You're not bilingual, so what? Library Media Connection, 2(4), 22-25.

Martin, C. (2016). A library's role in digital equity. Young Adult Library Services, 14(4),  34-36.

 

Schrodt, K., Fain, J. G., & Hasty, M. (2015). "Exploring culturally relevant texts with kindergartners and their families." Reading Teacher, 68(8), 589-598.

 

Stripling, B. K. (2015). "Creating a culture of intellectual freedom through leadership and advocacy." Knowledge Quest, 44(1), 14-19.

 

Zilonis, Mary Frances, and Chris Swerling. "On Common Ground. Effective Teaching Strategies for ELL Students in the School Library, Part 1: What Language Do You Speak?." School Library Connection August 2016.

 

Zilonis, Mary Frances, and Chris Swerling. "On Common Ground. Effective Teaching Strategies for ELL Students in the School Library, Part 2: Word Walls." School Library Connection August 2016.

Gangwish, Kim. "Deaf ≠ Silenced: Serving the Needs of the Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Students in School Libraries." School Library Connection October 2015.

 

Li, S. C. (2015). Advancing multicultural education: New historicism in the high school English classroom. High School Journal, 99(1), 4-26.

 

Peterson, B., Gunn, A., Brice, A., &  Alley, K. Exploring names and identity through multicultural literature in K-8 ​classrooms. Multicultural Perspectives, 2015 17(1), 39-45.

GENERAL

Lewis, C. W., & Landsman, J. (2010). White Teachers, Diverse Classrooms: Creating Inclusive Schools, Building on Students' Diversity, and Providing True Educational Equity. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing. (Available  in EBSCOhost eBook database)

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc

Equity Brochure. ALA, n.d).

Resource guide for underserved populations. AASL, 2016)..

 

KQ 

Adams, Helen, Editor. "Intellectual Freedom." Knowledge Quest vol. 44, no. 1, Sept/Oct. 2015. Full issue.

 

Adams, Helen. "Intellectual Freedom." Knowledge Quest vol. 36, no. 2, Nov/Dec 2007. pp.12-15.

Butler, R. P. (2016). Copyright and school libraries in the digital age. Knowledge Quest, 45(2), 6-7. 

 

Hunsinger, V. (2015). "School librarians as equity warriors." Knowledge Quest, vol. 44, no. 1, Sept-Oct 2015.

 

Kumasi, Kafi and Sandra Hughes-Hassell, eds. “Diversity Matters: Moving Beyond Equality Toward Equity in Youth Services.” Knowledge Quest, vol.45, no. 3, Jan-Feb. 2017.

 

Books

Bush, G. M., ed. (2009). School library media programs in action: Civic engagement, social justice, and equity. Chicago, IL: AASL. (Best of KQ series)

 

Magi, T. & Garnar, M., eds. (2015).  Intellectual freedom manual, 9th ed. Chicago, IL: ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom.

 

Montiel-Overall, P. & Adcock, D. C., eds.  (2009). School library services in a multicultural society.  Chicago, IL: AASL. (Best of KQ Series)

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #4 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #4: Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment

        COMPETENCY 4 RUBRIC

Moreillon, Judi. "Coteaching: A Strategic Evidence-Based Practice for Collaborating School Librarians." School Library Connection February 2016.

 

Moreillon, Judi. "Leadership: School Librarian Evaluation." School Library Monthly 30.2 (2013): n. pag. Digital file.

 

Valenza, Joyce Kasman. Mindset for School Library Innovators. Infographic. Infographic file. Joyce’s skill at explaining what it takes to be a school librarian is consummate, and this pictograph is a strong example.

Morris, Rebecca J. "The Power of Sharing Assessment." School Library Connection March 2016.
 

Colorado Dept of Ed Highly Effective School Library Program. Judy’s Example 3rd grade Annual Growth Plan Template. Colorado Dept. of Ed, n.d.

Colorado Dept. of Ed.  Highly Effective School Library Program with rubric. Colorado Dept. of Ed., 2016.
 

Stripling, Barbara K. "Building Trust and Empowerment through Assessment." School Library Connection March 2016.

 

Zilonis, Mary Francis, and Chris Swerling. "On Common Ground: A Relevant Library Curriculum Ensures Rigor." School Library Connection, Jan.-Feb. 2017, p. 45.

Colorado Dept. of Ed.  Highly Effective School Library Program with rubric. Colorado Dept. of Ed., 2016.
 

Waskie-Laura, Nicole, and Susan LeBlanc. "Images for Inquiry: Using Visually Based Texts to Scaffold Complexity." School Library Connection November 2015.
 

Wendell, Diana. "Data-Driven Collaboration: Student Assessment Data as a Partner in Academic Success." School Library Connection, Mar. 2016, pp. 31-33.

GENERAL

The School Librarian’s Guide to Success in the PA Department of Education Educator Effectiveness System: Using The Model Curriculum for PA School Library Programs as a Foundation and Possible examples of how the Framework For Teaching could apply to School Librarians

Harada, Violet H. and Joan M. Yoshina. Inquiry Learning through Librarian-Teacher Partnerships. Linworth, 2004.

 

Kuhlthau, Carol C., Leslie K. Maniotes & Ann K. Caspari.  Guided Inquiry : Learning in the 21st Century, 2nd edition.   Libraries Unlimited, 2015.

 

Loertscher, David, Carol Koechlin & Sandi Zwann. Ban Those Bird Units! 15 Models for Teaching and Learning in Information-rich and Technology-rich Environments. Hi Willow Research and Publishing, 2005.

 

McKenzie, Jamie. Learning to Question, to Wonder, to Learn.  FNO Press, 2005.
 

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc.

Standards for the 21st-Century Learner. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2007.

Standards for the 21st-Century Learner in Action. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2009.

Learning Standards & Program Guidelines Implementation Toolkit

Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk

Common Core State Standards Action Brief (AASl and Achieve)

 

KQ

Bergstrom-Michael, Tasha and Jole Seroff, Editors. Themed Issue: “What makes a Literacy? Knowledge Quest 44:5, May/June 2016.

 

Keeling, Mary, Editor. Inquiry. Knowledge Quest 43:2, November/December 2014.

 

Moreillon, Judi and Susan Ballard, Editors. Coteaching. Knowledge Quest 40:4, March/April 2012.

School Library Research

 

Kimmel, Sue. Collaboration as School Reform: Are There Patterns in the Chaos of Planning with Teachers?  pdf icon School Library Research Vol. 15 (2012).

 

Todd, Ross J. "Evidence-Based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of Evidence, Advocacy, and Actions." Knowledge Quest 43:3 (Jan./Feb. 2015):8-15. 

 

Valenza, Joyce Kasman. "Evolving with Evidence: Leveraging New Tools for EBP." Knowledge Quest (Jan./Feb. 2015):36-43.

 

Books

Moreillon, Judi and Ballard, Susan, eds. Instructional partnership: Pathway to Leadership. AASL,  2012. (Best of KQ series)

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #5 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #5: Community of Care and Support for Students

       COMPETENCY 5 RUBRIC

Techman, Melissa. "Beyond Junior Shelvers: Involving Students in Creative Library Work." School Library Connection February 2016.

 

Wolcott, Linda Lachance. “Understanding How Teachers Plan: Strategies for Successful Instructional Partnerships.” SLMR, vol. 22, no. 3, Spring 199: 161-66. Accessed 1 Mar 2017.
 

Be sure to look at the ALA publications listed below.

Barnett, Cassandra. “The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same.Knowledge Quest, vol. 43, no. 4, March/April 2015, pp. 30–38.

 

Holzweiss, Kristina and Gina Seymour. "Community Action and the Student Maker." School Library Connection October 2016.

 

Jones, Jami.. Dropout Prevention through the School Library: Dispositions, Relationships, and Instructional Practices. School Libraries Worldwide, 15. 2(200): 77-90.

 

Plemmons, Andy. "Power of Student Voice." School Library Connection  August 2016.
 

Wallace, Virginia and Whitney Norwood Husid. Collaboration for Inquiry-Based Learning: School Librarians and Teachers Partner for Student Achievement, 2nd ed. ABC-CLIO, 2016.

Buzzeo, Toni. Collaborating to Meet Standards. Linworth Publishing, 2007. (K-2, 2007 K-6, 2nd ed., 2007; 7-12, 2002]

 

Hartman, Angela. "From Wonder to Social Justice: How One Book Changed a Community." School Library Connection  June 2016.

 

Hartzell, Gary N. Building Influence for the School Librarian: Tenets, Targets & Tactics. Linworth Pub., 2003.
 

Kuhlthau, Carol C., Leslie K. Maniotes and Ann K. Caspari. Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century, 2nd ed. Libraries Unlimited, 2015.
 

Jones, Jami L. (2013). Caring is essential. Knowledge Quest , vol.40, no.5., May/June 2012.

 

Kimmel, Sue C. “Pass the Chocolate Planning with Teachers. Knowledge Quest, vol. 42. No. 1, September/October 2013, pp. 48-51.
 

Kuhlthau, Carol C., Leslie K. Maniotes and Ann K. Caspari. Guided Inquiry Design: A Framework for Inquiry in Your School. Libraries Unlimited, 2012.

GENERAL

Kaaland, Christie. Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery in School Libraries: Creating a Safe Haven. ABC-CLIO, 2014.

 

Morris, Rebecca J. School Libraries and Student Learning: A Guide for School Leaders. Harvard Education Press, 2015.

 

Small, Ruth V., Marilyn P Arnone, Barbara K. Stripling and Pam Berger. Teaching for Inquiry: Engaging the Learner Within. Nea- Schumann, 2012.

 

Sullivan, Margaret L. High Impact School Library Spaces: Envisioning New School Library Concepts. Libraries Unlimited, 2014.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Papers, Policies and Toolkits

Definition for Effective School Library Program. 2016.

Parent Advocate Toolkit . n.d.

Resource Guide for Underserved Populations. AASL, 2016.

School Library Program Health and Wellness Toolkit. 2009.

School Libraries Transform Learning, 2014.  (digitalmagazine)

Strong School Libraries Build Strong Students. 2013. (infographic)

 

KQ

Harland, Pam, Editor. Library Spaces. Knowledge Quest 42:4 March/April 2014.

 

Jones, Jami.L., Editor. (2013). Caring is essential. Knowledge Quest, 40:5 May/June 2012.

 

Books

Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2009.

 

21st-Century Approach to School Librarian Evaluation (Twenty-First Century Approach to School Librarian Evaluation). American Library Association, 2012.

 

Martin, Ann M. Empowering Leadership: Developing Behaviors for Success. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2013.

 

Sullivan, Margaret. Library Spaces for 21st-Century Learners: A Planning Guide for Creating New School Library Concepts. Chicago: American Library Association, 2013.

 

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #6 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #6: Professional Capacity of School Library Personnel

          COMPETENCY 6 RUBRIC

Jones, Jami, and Gail Bush. "What Defines an Exemplary School Librarian? An Exploration of Professional Dispositions." School Library Management, edited by Judi Repman and Gail K. Dickinson, ABC-CLIO, 2015, pp. 55-57.

 

Stenzel, Carolyn. "’ I'm New Here…’ Making Friends, Staying Strong, and Having a Fantastic First Year as a School Librarian." Knowledge Quest, vol. 44, no. 2, 2015, pp. 74-77.
 

Warlick, David. "In-time, On-going, & Self-directed Professional Development: Personal learning networks." Digital Learning Collaborative, 2012.

 

Belardi, Bridget E. "The Administrator's Academy: Changing a District's Technological Mindset." School Library Connection January 2017. Really about how one librarian learned to develop her knowledge and job to influence her administration.

 

Moreillon, Judi. “Building Your Personal Learning Network. (PLN): 21st-Century School Librarians Seek Self-Regulated Professional Development Online.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 44 no. 3, 2016, pp. 64-69.

 

Jones, Jami, and Gail Bush. "What Defines an Exemplary School Librarian? An Exploration of Professional Dispositions." School Library Management, edited by Judi Repman and Gail K. Dickinson, ABC-CLIO, 2015, pp. 55-57.

Cox, Marge. "Back to the Future Professional Development." Knowledge Quest, vol. 43 no. 4, 2015, 46.

 

Cooper, O. P. "How ISTE's Standards for Technology Coaches inform AASL's Standards for School Librarians." TechTrends, vol. 59, no. 3, 2015, pp. 48-53.    
 

Hoffman, Kelly M. and Mega Subramaniam, Saba Kawas, Ligaya Scaff, and Katie Davis. Connected Libraries: Surveying the Current Landscape and Charting a Path to the Future​. PDF. ConnectedLib Project, 2016.

 

Kodama, Christie, et al. "Lilead Fellows Program: An Innovative Approach to Professional Development for School Library Leaders." Knowledge Quest, vol. 44, no. 4, 2016, pp. 54-59.

 

Fontichiaro, Kristin, and Angela Elkordy. "Digital Badges: Purposeful Design in Professional Learning Outcomes for K-12 Educators." Foundation of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials. Springer International Publishing, 2016. Pp. 287-305.
 

Kuon, Tricia, Juanita Flores, and Janie Pickett. "The Biggest Classroom in the Building: Libraries Staffed with Certified Librarians in Many Schools Hold Unexploited Potential to Raise Achievement and Meet the More Rigorous Demands of the Common Core." Phi Delta Kappan, vol. 95, no. 7, 2014, pp. 65-67.

 

GENERAL

Barack, Lauren. “School Librarians Want More Tech—and Bandwidth | SLJ 2015 Tech Survey.” School Library Journal,  3 Aug. 2015.
 

Office of Educational Technology. Future Ready Librarians. 2016.

 

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc

AASL eAcademy course list  

eCOLLAB complementary content. Additional content available with AASL membership login.

 

KQ

Knowledge Quest Blog.  Professional Development topic thread

 

Gordon, Carol, Editor. “Evidence-based practice.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 43, no. 3,  Jan./Feb. 2015.

 

Starkey, Carolyn Jo, Editor. “Personal Learning Networks.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 41, no. 2 Nov./Dec. 2012. Pp. 6+.

 

Ballard, Susan D. (2016). "AASL at 65: A Reflection on and Affirmation of Enduring Core Values that Sustain Us." Knowledge Quest, vol. 45, no. 1, 2015-16, pp. 26-33.

Montiel-Overall, Patricia and Donald C. Adcock, eds. Collaboration. Best of KQ series. AASL, 2007.

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #7 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #7: Professional Community for Teachers and Staff

            COMPETENCY 7 RUBRIC

Abilock, Debbie, Violet H. Harada and Kristin  Fontichiaro, K. “Growing Schools: Effective Professional Development.” Teacher Librarian, vol. 41, no. 1, 2013, pp. 8-13.

 

Desimone, L. M. “ A Primer on Effective Professional Development.” Phi Delta Kappan, 92(6), 2011, 68-71.

 

Gerwitz, Stacey. "The Many Faces of Collaboration." School Library Connection December 2015.

 

Harvey, C. “Adult Learners: Professional Development and the School Librarian.”  Libraries Unlimited, 2012.
 

Thessin, R. A., and J. P. Starr.  “Supporting the Growth of Effective Professional Learning Communities Districtwide.”  Phi Delta Kappan, 92(6), 2011. pp. 48-54.

Dana, N. F., & D. Yendel-Hoppey. “The Reflective Educator’s Guide to Professional Development: Coaching Inquiry-Oriented Learning Communities.” Corwin, 2008.

 

Danielson, Charlotte.  “Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching,” 2nd ed. ASCD, March, 2008

 

Kaplan, A. G. Is your School Librarian 'Highly Qualified'?  Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 89, No. 04, December 2007, pp. 300-303.

 

Harvey, Carl A., II. "Collaborating with the Coach." School Library Connection February 2016.
 

Wolf, M.A, R. Jones, and D. Gilbert. Leading in and beyond the library,  Alliance for Excellent Education, Jan. 28, 2014.

Ahlfield, Kelly  “Hands on Learning with a Hands-Off Approach for Professional Development.” School Library Monthly, 26 (6), Feb 2010. pp. 16-18.

 

Anderson, Mary Alice  Jump-starting Staff Development. School Library Journal; 49(8), 36.  Aug 2003.

 

Harvey II, Carl  Putting On the Professional Development Hat. School Library Monthly, 29(5), Feb 2013. pp.32-34.

 

Johnston, Melissa. "Professional Learners. Differentiating for Adult Learners." School Library Connection May 2016.

 

Montiel-Overall, Patricia & Anthony C.R. Hernández,  “The Effect of Professional Development on Teacher and Librarian Collaboration.”  School Library Research, v15   (2012)

Evans, Stony, and Misti Bell. "Collaborating with Teachers on the ‘Fringe." School Library Connection February 2016.

 

Higgs-Horwell, Melissa; Schwelik, Jennifer  “Building a Professional Learning Community: Getting a Large Return on a Small Investment--I Get by with a Little Help from My Friends. Library Media Connection, v26 n3 Nov-Dec 2007. p36-38

 

Valenza, J.K.  “Reimagining School Libraries to Lead Future Learning. In School Librarianship: Past, Present, and Future” Edited by Susan Alman. Beta Phi Mu Scholars Series. Rowman & Littlefield (2016 in process)
 

Wolf, Mary Ann; Jones, Rachel; Gilbert, Daniel. Leading In and Beyond the Library. Alliance for Excellent Education, 2014.

GENERAL

Abilock, Debbie, Kristin Fontichiaro & Violet Harada (editors). Growing Schools: Librarians as Professional Developers. ABC-CLIO, 2012.
 

Sykes, Judith. The Whole School Library Learning Commons: An Educator's Guide: An Educator's Guide. Forward by David Loertscher. ABC-CLIO, 2016.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc

AASL: Working Together Is Working Smarter Infographic

 

KQ
Johnston, Melissa, and Ann M. Martin, Editors. "Mentoring Through Partnerships." Knowledge Quest, vol. 41, no. 4, Mar.-Apr. 2013.

 

School Library Research
Harada, Violet. “A Practice-Centered Approach to Professional Development: Teacher-Librarian Collaboration in Capstone Projects.” pdf icon School Library Research Vol. 19 (2016).

 

Sue Kimmel. Collaboration as School Reform: Are There Patterns in the Chaos of Planning with Teachers?  pdf icon School Library Research Vol. 15 (2012).

 

Montiel-Overall, Patricia and Anthony C.R. Hernandez. "The Effect of Professional Development on Teacher and Librarian Collaboration: Preliminary Findings Using a Revised Instrument." SLMR, vol. 15, 2012.

Books

Martin, Ann. Empowering Leadership. ALA, 2013.

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #8 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #8: Meaningful Engagement of Families and Community

           COMPETENCY 8 RUBRIC

Ayoub, Lee, Greg D'Addario, Anne Malleck, and Sandra Sterne. "Getting Second-Language Parents Involved..Here's How!" School Library Connection  September 2015.

Phipps-Soeiro, Liz. “Turning the School Library into a Community Hub: Here’s How.” School Library Journal, 21 Apr. 2015.

 

Pennsylvania School Librarians Association, Tools for Parents. PSLA, 2016.
 

Smith, Daniella. “Embracing Mutual Interest: Strategies for Collaborating with Public Librarians. School Library Connection February 2016.

ALSC. ALSC/AASL/YALSA School/Public Library Cooperation. Association for Library Service to Children, 2009.

 

Carpinelli, Tish. "3D Printing in the Media Center: A Dynamic Tool for Learning and Outreach." School Library Connection  January 2016.

 

Murvosh, Marta. Partners in Success: When school and public librarians join forces, kids win. School Library Journal, Jan. 1, 2013

 

TLA. Educating a Child in 2015: Administrators & School Librarians Partnering for Student Success. Texas Library Assn, 2015.

TLA. Educating a Child in 2015: Parents & School Librarians Partnering for Student Success.  Texas Library Assn, 2015.

TLA. Educating a Child in 2015: Teachers & School Librarians Partnering for Student Success.   Texas Library Assn, 2015.
 

ALSC. ALSC/AASL/YALSA School/Public Library Cooperation. Association for Library Service to Children, 2009.

Bengel, Tricia." Nashville Public Library Partners with Local School Libraries to Boost Results for Students." School Library Journal, July 17, 2014. 

 

Hand, Dorcas. Students Need Libraries in HISD. SNL-HISD, 2013-present.

Home Page shows group’s Mission

HISD pages to engage community discussion with school board

Advocacy Tools for Allies collects on separate pages useful articles and links for parents, teachers, administrators and policy makers.

 

Stewart, Ken. Transforming School Communities: An Interview with Blue Valley High School's Ken Stewart including link to his Blue Valley HS LibGuide. Libraries Transform, 2015.

GENERAL

Non-library perspectives on Family and Community Engagement

Minnesota Dept. of Education. Family, School and Community Engagement . n.d. No direct mention of libraries, but strong overview of the concept of family engagement

National Center for Families Learning. Family engagement Brief. 2014. 2 public school systems and a public library – no direct mention of a school library but a strong overview of what family and community engagement can do for students.

Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction. Family and Community Engagement. n.d.

Ventura [CA] County Ofc of Education “Purpose of Family Engagement.” n.d.

Ventura County [CA] Office of Education. Family Engagement Think Tank. n.d.

 

School Library perspectives on Family and Community Engagement

University of Pittsburgh and PA School Librarians Association. Pennsylvania The School Librarian's Guide to Success in the PDE Educator Effectiveness System (p.25-27 as well as Examples for School Librarians; Guiding Questions For School Librarians). 2016.

Youth Services Librarianship. School Library and Public Library Collaboration. 2011-2013.

Alliance for Excellent Education. "Leading In and Beyond the Library." Alliance for Excellent Education. N.p., 28 Jan. 2014.

Utah Library Assn., Collaboration Between School and Public Libraries Best Practices. ULA, 2011.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc

Toolkit for Promoting School Libraries. AASL, 2014-15.

Resource Guide for Underserved Populations. AASL, 2016.

Parent Advocate Toolkit. AASL, n.d.

Brochures: School Library Programs Improve Student Learning (parents, parents-spanish, teachers, administrators, policy makers)

Standards for 21st Century Learner

Declaration for the Right to School Libraries

 

E-collab

Stewart, Ken. Transform Your Library Community. Webinar (36 minutes) AASL E-collab, 2016.

 

KQ

Green, Lucy Santos, Editor. School Library and University Partnerships. Knowledge Quest 44:2 (2015-16). Themed issue.

 

Barnett, Cassandra, Editor. Summer Learning. Knowledge Quest 43:5,May/June 2015.

Harland, Pam, Editor. Library Spaces. Knowledge Quest 42:4 March/April 2014

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation

  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #9 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #9: Operations and Management

               COMPETENCY 9 RUBRIC

Weisburg, Hilda, and Ruth Toor. New on the Job: a School Librarian's Guide to Success, Second Edition. Chicago, ALA Editions, an Imprint of the American Library Association, 2015.

Donham, Jean. Enhancing Teaching and Learning: a Leadership Guide for School Library Media Specialists, Second Edition. New York, Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2008.

 

Donnelly, Andria. "Collaboration and Flexible Schedules: Winning Administrative Support." School Library Connection  March 2016.

 

Weisburg, Hilda, and Ruth Toor. New on the Job: a School Librarian's Guide to Success, Second Edition. Chicago, ALA Editions, an Imprint of the American Library Association, 2015.

 

Woolls, Blanche, and Ann C. Weeks. The School Library Manager, 5th Edition. Libraries Unlimited, 2013.
 

Young, Robyn. "Transforming My High School Library Facility." School Library Connection May 2016.

Loertscher, David V. et al. Ban Those Bird Units!: 15 Models for Teaching and Learning in Information-Rich and Technology-Rich Environments. Salt Lake City, UT, Hi Willow Research and Publishing, 2005.
 

Green, Lucy Santos, and Kathryn Kennedy. "School Librarians and K-12 Online/Blended Learning: Moving Critical Conversation beyond the Medium." School Library Connection  May 2016.

Weisburg, Hilda K., and Ruth Toor. Being Indispensable: A School Librarian's Guide to Becoming an Invaluable Leader. American Library Association, 2011.

GENERAL

Foote, C. “ReThinking Library.” TL Virtual Cafe - ReThinking Library, 2014.

 

Sullivan, Margaret L. High Impact School Library Spaces: Envisioning New School Library Concepts. Santa Barbara, CA, Libraries Unlimited, an Imprint of ABC-CLIO, LLC, 2015.
 

Woolls, Blanche, Ann C. Weeks, and Sharon Coatney. The School Library Manager, 5th Edition. Libraries Unlimited, 2013.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Additional considerations

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc

AASL will release new standards in Fall 2017 and this will be updated accordingly.   
 

AASL Learning Standards & Common Core State Standards Crosswalk. Chicago, IL: American Association of School Librarians. 18 Feb. 2016.

Correlations between the AASL learning standards and the Next Generation Science Standards. Chicago, IL: American Association of School Librarians, 2015.    

Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Programs. Chicago, IL: American Association of School Librarians, 2009.

A Planning Guide for Empowering Learners with School Library Program Assessment Rubric. Chicago, IL: American Association of School Librarians. 19 Feb. 2016.

Martin, Ann M. Empowering Leadership: Developing Behaviors for Success. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2013.

Standards for the 21st-Century Learner. Chicago, IL: American Association of School Librarians, 2007.

Standards for the 21st-Century Learner In Action (indicators, benchmarks, model examples and assessments). Chicago, IL: American Library Association, 2013.

 

KQ

Church, Audrey, and Frances Reeve, Editors. “The Solo Librarian.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 40, no. 2, November/December 2011.

 

DeGroat, Wendy and Stephen Yates, Editors. “Futurecasting.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 40, no. 3, January/February 2012.

 

Jones, Jami, Editor. “Caring Is Essential.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 40, no. 5, May/June 2012.

 

Kimmel, Sue C. and Nancy E. Larsen, Editors. “Imagining the Future.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 42, no. 1, September/October 2013.

 

Harland, Pam, Editor. “Library Spaces.” Knowledge Quest, vol. 42, no. 4, March/April 2014.

 

School Library Research

Dow, Mirah J., and Jacqueline Mcmahon-Ladin. “School Librarian Staffing Levels and Student Achievement as Represented in 2006–2009 Kansas Annual Yearly Progress Data.” School Library Research, vol. 15, 2012. ERIC file.

 

Books

Kerby, Mona. Collection Development for the School Library Media Program: a Beginner's Guide. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2006.

 

Kimmel, Sue Crownfield. Developing Collections to Empower Learners. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians a Division of the American Library Association, 2014.

 

Martin, Ann M. Empowering Leadership: Developing Behaviors for Success. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2013.

 

Sullivan, Margaret. Library Spaces for 21st-Century Learners: A Planning Guide for Creating New School Library Concepts. Chicago, IL, American Library Association, 2013.

 

Owen, Patricia. A 21st-Century Approach to: School Librarian Evaluation. Chicago, IL, American Association of School Librarians, 2012.

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)
  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion
  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation
  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

Resources for Competency #10 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #10: School Improvement

              COMPETENCY 10 RUBRIC

University of Illinois' Graduate School of Library and Information Science “Inquiry-Based Learning.” Youth Services Librarianship wiki. University of Illinois' Graduate School of Library and Information Science, N.p.

 

Buzzeo, Toni. The Collaboration Handbook. Columbus, OH: Linworth, 2008

 

New York City School Library System, Empire State Information Fluency Continuum. New York, NY: New York City Department of Education, Office of Library Services,  2013.

Coatney, Sharon. The Many Faces of School Library Leadership. Santa Barbara, CA, Libraries Unlimited, 2010.

 

Martin, Ann M. "Program Assessment: Enjoy the Journey and Results!" School Library Connection March 2016.

 

Tomlinson, Carol A. The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners. Alexandria, VA, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1999.
 

Wallace, Virginia, and Whitney Norwood. Husid. Collaborating for Inquiry-Based Learning: School Librarians and Teachers Partner for Student Achievement. Santa Barbara, CA, Libraries Unlimited, 2011.

Lancaster, Adam. “School Libraries: Using Data to Boost Student Literacy.”Teacher's Blog, Guardian News and Media, 16 Oct. 2012.

 

Lickteig, Stacy, and Jo O'Garro. “Data Crunching Proved This School Library Program Was Crucial. School Library Journal, School Library Journal, 8 July 2016.
 

Woolls, Blanche et al. The School Library Manager. Santa Barbara, CA, Libraries Unlimited, 2014.

Calhoun, Emily F. “Action Research for School Improvement.Educational Leadership, vol. 59, no. 6, Mar. 2002, pp. 18–24.

 

Loertscher, David V., and Ross J. Todd. We Boost Achievement!: Evidence-Based Practice for School Library Media Specialists. Salt Lake City UT, Hi Willow Research, 2003.
 

Todd, Ross J. "Evidence-based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of evidence, advocacy and actions." Knowledge Quest 43.3 (2015): 8.

GENERAL

Bishop, Kay. Connecting Libraries with Classrooms: the Curricular Roles of the Media Specialist. 2nd ed., Worthington, OH, Linworth Pub., 2011.

 

Harada, Violet H., and Joan M. Yoshina. Assessing for Learning: Librarians and Teachers as Partners. Revised and expanded. Westport, CT, Libraries Unlimited, 2010.

 

Hughes-Hassell, Sandra, and Violet H. Harada. School Reform and the School Library Media Specialist. Westport, CT, Libraries Unlimited, 2007.
 

Kuhlthau, Carol Collier et al. Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century. 2nd ed. Westport, CT, Libraries Unlimited, 2007.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc

Toolkit for Promoting School Libraries. AASL, 2014-15.

Resource Guide for Underserved Populations. AASL, 2016.

The School Librarian’s Role in Reading (position statement). ALA, 2010.

School Librarian’s Role in Reading Toolkit. ALA, n.d.

 

KQ

Keeling, Mary, Editor. Inquiry. Knowledge Quest 42:2 November/December 2014.

 

School Library Research

Sue Kimmel. Collaboration as School Reform: Are There Patterns in the Chaos of Planning with Teachers?  pdf icon School Library Research Vol. 15 (2012).

Books

Weisburg, Hilda & Ruth Toor. Being Indispensable: A School Librarian’s Guide to Becoming an Invaluable Leader. ALA, 2011.

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)
  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion
  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation
  • Intellectual freedom; Equity of access; Privacy; Confidentiality; Collaboration; Curation

 

Resources for Competency #11 - Useful Resources by Level of Understanding and Practice

Competency #11: Literacy and Reading

             COMPETENCY 11 RUBRIC

Bates, Naomi. "Linking Literature to the Classroom." School Library Connection  June 2016.

 

Ruefle, Anne. Creating a Culture of Literacy: Programming Ideas for Elementary School Librarians. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited (ABC-CLIO), 2009.

 

Philpot, Chelsey. "How to Create a "Culture of Reading" | AASL 2013." School Library Journal. N.p., 25 Nov. 2013. Web.

Book Trust. Choosing Just the Right Book! Lesson Plan. BookTrust.org.

 

BrainPop. "Ideas for Using BrainPOP Jr. to Teach Literacy." BrainPop Educators, BrainPop.

 

Kaaland, Christie. "There's Work to Be Done!" WNDB. weneeddiversebooks.org." School Library Connection  September 2015.

 

Krashen, Stephen D. The Power of Reading: Insights from the Research, 2nd ed.. Libraries Unlimited, 2004.

 

Varachi, Christine. The Tibrarian Handbook: A Teacher-Librarian's Guide to Transforming the Library Into a Center of Learning. Upstart Books, 2012.

Serravallo, Jennifer. The Reading Strategies book: Your Everything Guide to Developing Skilled Readers. Heinemann, 2013.

 

Nesi, Olga M. Getting Beyond “Interesting”: Teaching Students the Vocabulary of Appeal to Discuss Their Reading. ABC-CLIO, 2012.

Reed, Jennifer Kelley. "Growing Readers and Parent Involvement through Picture Book Month." School Library Connection, November 2015.

Plunkett, Katie, Kellie Keyser, Mary Craig, and Sarah FitzHenry . "How Does Books on Bikes Work?" School Library Connection, May 2016.
 

Scholastic. "School Libraries Work! A Compendium of Research Supporting the Effectiveness of School Libraries." PDF file, 2016. Downloadable.

GENERAL

Arcia, Antero. Digital Is: The Many Forms of Literacy. National Writing Project, 2013.

"Global Read Aloud: One Book to Connect the World." Global Read Aloud.

Martin, Ann. M. Seven Steps to An Award Winning School Library Program. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited, 2005.

National Council of Teachers of English. "The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies." NCTE National Council of Teachers of English, Feb. 2013.

"We Need Diverse Books." We Need Diverse Books, 2014-15.

AASL Position Statements & other publications

Position Statements, Policies, Toolkits, etc

AASL, The School Librarian’s Role in Reading (position statement). ALA, 2010.

AASL, School Librarian’s Role in Reading Toolkit. ALA, n.d.

AASL SLMS Role in Reading Task Force. "What Every SLMS Should Know about Multiple Literacies." ALA, 2009.

YALSA Issue Brief: Teens Need Libraries  

YALSA Teens Need Libraries brochure

YALSA Adolescent Literacy Wiki

ALSC Babies Need Words Every Day

 

KQ

Bergstrom-Michaels, Tasha and Jole Seroff, Editors. What Makes a Literacy? Knowledge Quest 44:5 May/June 2016.

 

Barnett, Cassandra, Editor. Summer Learning. Knowledge Quest 43:5 May/June 2015.

 

School Library Research

Moore, Jennifer, and Maria Cahill. “Audiobooks: Legitimate ‘Reading’ Material for Adolescents? pdf icon School Library Research Vol. 19 (2016).

Kovalik, Cindy; Yutzey, Susan; and Laura Piazza. Information Literacy and High School Seniors: Perceptions of the Research Process. pdf icon  School Library Research Vol. 16 (2013).

 

Books

Bush, Gail. Every Student Reads: Collaboration and Reading to Learn.  ALA, 2005.

 

Kimmel, Sue C. Developing Collections to Empower Learners. AASL, 2014.

 

Moreillon, Judi, Coteaching Reading Comprehension Strategies in Elementary School Libraries.: Maximizing Your Impact. ALA, 2013.

 

---, Coteaching Reading Comprehension Strategies in Secondary School Libraries.: Maximizing Your Impact. ALA, 2012.

Additional considerations

In building skills in this area, it will be important to also read related standards and information that should be intrinsic to an understanding of Mission, Vision and Core Values. Readers will want to make specific reference to

  • ISTE’s core standards for digital literacy, critical thinking, etc.: Administrators, Teachers and Students (3 separate documents)

  • the ESSA process as it develops in coming years - use language that positions you for maximum inclusion

  • all aspects of FutureReady Libraries including collaboration and curation.


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